Book Recommendation: Medical Miracles

Back in September I linked to an article by an atheist doctor, Jacalyn Duffin, who confirmed a healing deemed miraculous by the Vatican. In the article she says she investigated over 1,400 miracle investigations by the Roman Catholic Church conducted between 1588 and 1999. For Christmas I received her Medical Miracles: Doctors, Saints, and Healing …

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Atheist Doctor Confirms Healing Deemed Miraculous

Here's an interesting article about an atheist doctor who testified about an alleged miraculous healing. The doctor admits she cannot explain the case scientifically. It brings to mind Luke 16:31: "If they do not respond to Moses and the prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead." Pondering Miracles, Medical …

Rebuttal to Miracles and Probability from Lourdes to Lazarus

This past week, in the course of a discussion concerning the resurrection of Christ, Nicholas Covington borrowed an argument from philosopher Matt McCormick in an attempt to show that eyewitnesses to alleged miracles are very, very unreliable. The focus of this post is on slide 2 from McCormick's presentation, where he makes the following assertions: …

The Number of Resuscitation Accounts Found in Craig Keener’s Miracles

I'm in a discussion with Jeffery Jay Lowder over at The Secular Outpost concerning Bayes' Theorem and the adage "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence" (ECREE). I'm skeptical that applying Bayes' Theorem to historical claims will help us in our historical inquiries but it's worth discussing. One issue is how to calculate the prior probability of …

Response to Selective Sources

Deacon Duncan (henceforth DD) of the Evangelical Realism blog is reviewing William Lane Craig's book On Guard. In the most recent post, Selective Sources, he is commenting on Craig's treatment concerning the historical Jesus. I have not read this book by Craig but DD's post contains a few problems common to arguments from skeptics that …

Review of Miracles: The Credibility of the New Testament Accounts

In the two-volume work Miracles: The Credibility of the New Testament Accounts, Craig S. Keener argues for two theses. The first thesis is that eyewitnesses do offer miracle claims. The second thesis is that supernatural explanations of miracle accounts should be on the table in scholarly discussions. The theses tie into the historical study of …