Commentary on Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History 3.39

Text In H.E. 3.39, Eusebius of Caesarea provides both information about Papias and quotations from Papias: (1) There are extant five books of Papias, which bear the title Expositions of Oracles of the Lord. Irenaeus makes mention of these as the only works written by him, in the following words: "These things are attested by … Continue reading Commentary on Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History 3.39

Salome

According to Mark, Salome was one of the women who watched Jesus's crucifixion from a distance (Mk 15:40). She had followed Jesus and given him support when he was in Galilee (Mk 15:41). On Easter morning, she was one of the women who discovered the empty tomb (Mk 16:1). Matthew follows Mark in mentioning Mary … Continue reading Salome

Authorship of the Letters of John

Introduction Tradition ascribes authorship of the Letters of John to the apostle John, son of Zebedee and brother of James. Tradition also credits him with writing the Gospel of John and Revelation. Internal Evidence Anonymous? Technically the letters of John are anonymous, meaning the author does not provide his personal name within the body of … Continue reading Authorship of the Letters of John

The Anti-Marcionite Prologues to the Gospels

Introduction The Anti-Marcionite Prologues to the Gospels are short prefixes to the gospels of Mark, Luke, and John. If there ever was a prefix to the gospel of Matthew it has been lost. The prologues are so named because they were once thought by Donatien de Bruyne to have an anti-Marcion sentiment. In fact, only … Continue reading The Anti-Marcionite Prologues to the Gospels

Revelation

Authorship The author identifies himself as John (1:1, 4, 9; 22:8). He does not identify himself as an apostle but rather calls himself a servant (1:1; 19:10) and a prophet (1:3; 22:7, 9, 18-19). He received his revelation on the island of Patmos (1:9) and wrote to communities in the Roman province of Asia (1:4). … Continue reading Revelation