Review of Has God Spoken? by Hank Hanegraaff

As you would expect from the title, Has God Spoken? Proof of the Bible’s Divine Inspiration, Hank Hanegraaff argues for the divine inspiration of Scripture. In chapters 1-6 the author summarizes reasons for believing the Bible is historically accurate and that the original wording of the Bible has been preserved. In chapters 7-11 he notes a number of archaeological discoveries that confirm the Biblical narrative. In chapters 12-16 he notes fulfilled prophecies and counters allegations of false prophecies. Chapters 17-22 close the book with suggestions on how read the Bible with examples responding to the claims of skeptics.

There is one particularly weak chapter in the book. In chapter 11 he points to the Epic of Gilgamesh as confirmation of the flood narrative in Genesis 6-9. It is true that the Bible and the Epic of Gilgamesh share some similarities, but it is also the case that there are many differences. He does not adequately explain why we should accept the Bible’s account over the Sumerian account. He also fails to deal with scientific and historical objections to the Biblical flood narrative.

Overall I found this book to be a good summary of some arguments to support the divine inspiration of the Bible. However, it does not go into enough depth to be convincing to skeptics. I would recommend it as an introductory book on apologetics that could then be supplemented with other arguments. I’m not sure how useful it would be to the more knowledgeable apologist or the skeptic looking for detailed answers.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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